ANTH - Anthropology

ANTH411 Anthropology of Immigration and Health (3 Credits)

The United Nations estimates that some 230 million people around the world are migrants who live outside their country of birth. This course focuses on these migrant populations, considering the implications of movement across borders and settlement in new societies on their health and well-being. We will investigate the social, political, and economic structures that shape disease and illness and produce differential access to health care for migrants. Within that context, we will explore the health effects of migration itself and particular health conditions from which migrants suffer. We will also examine how migrants interface with differently configured health care systems as well as strategies they and their advocates use to promote health and well-being.Jointly offered with ANTH611.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH411 or ANTH611.

ANTH412 Hypermarginality and Urban Health (3 Credits)

Using perspectives from medical and urban anthropology, we examine the phenomenon of hypermarginality--the clustering of extreme poverty, chronic disease, addiction, violence and trauma in certain social and spatial contexts, often urban. We will explore both the broader social, political, and economic structures of exclusion that produce hypermarginality, as well as the illness experiences associated with these conditions. As we consider both social suffering and the related institutional responses, we will also discuss the role of anthropological approaches in national discussions about health inequities.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH412 or ANTH612.

ANTH413 Health Disparities in the United States (3 Credits)

Powerful economic, political, social, and cultural forces shape who gets sick, what illnesses/diseases they get, how they are treated while seeking care, what treatment options they have, and what their ultimate health outcomes are. The goal of the course is to understand these processes through the lens of critical medical anthropology

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH468Q, ANTH688Q, ANTH413, or ANTH613.

Formerly: ANTH468Q.

ANTH415 Advanced Studies in Global Health (3 Credits)

Extends understandings of diverse health conditions facing world populations today and the science being made around them. Critically examines key issues in global aid and public health, with an emphasis on the theories, concepts, and methods of anthropology.

Recommended: ANTH210, ANTH310, or ANTH265 or a similar course focused on global health or medical anthropology course. Jointly offered with: ANTH615.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH415 or ANTH615.

ANTH416 Anthropology of Global Violence (3 Credits)

An examination of anthropological approaches to the study of violence, drawing from key texts to analyze how violence operates along a continuum: from routine, sometimes invisible forms of violence embedded in everyday life, to more overt and exceptional forms. Consideration of the role of ethnography in elucidating both the subjective experiences of violence and the ways in which violence is embedded in institutions, structures, and global political-economic processes. Analysis of the specific relationships between violence, health, mental health, and trauma in local and global contexts.Jointly offered with ANTH616.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH468O, ANTH66 8O, ANTH416 or ANTH616.

Formerly: ANTH468O.

ANTH421 Nutritional Anthropology (3 Credits)

The study of nutrition from an anthropological perspective which includes both biological and cultural aspects of nutrition. We will explore how nutrition can affect culture how culture can affect nutrition. Nutritional anthropology includes the study of cross-cultural variation in diet, nutritional status and subsistence systems as well as variation in these factors over the evolutionary course of human existence, from prehistoric and historic to modem times. Students will be introduced to nutritional anthropology and provided with the basics for assessing reliability and feasibility of nutritional advice and policy encountered in everyday modern life in a global setting.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH421, ANTH428N, or ANTH621.

Formerly: ANTH428N.

ANTH422 Human-Plant-(Human & Bioactive Plant) Interaction (3 Credits)

This seminar course will discuss the evolutionary, historical, cultural, and ecological aspects of coevolution with respect to humans and their interactions with specific bioactive plants. Case studies of human- plant-(pathogen) interactions will be discussed as well as an inclusive survey of anthropologically important phytochemicals. The seminar incorporates human-plant-(pathogen) interactions into models of human evolution and ecology.

Prerequisite: ANTH220 and ANTH320; or permission of BSOS-Anthropology department.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH422.

Formerly: ANTH428I.

ANTH424 Human Skeletal Anatomy (3 Credits)

In addition to descriptive information about bone identification, the lectures will address the history of human anatomical studies, the development of analytical techniques, and the application of these techniques in paleoanthropology, comparative anatomy, functional anatomy (and related fields, such as physical therapy), and skeletal analysis in museum, historic cemetery, archaeological, and forensic settings. Emphasis will be on the development of the skeleton and recognition of normal variation in bones. The laboratory sessions will allow the students access to human bones for the purpose of identification, documentation of human variation, and application of techniques to obtain information about the living individual from the skeleton.

ANTH428 Special Topics in Bioanthropology (3 Credits)

Advanced research courses in biological anthropology on changing topics that correspond to new theoretical interests, faculty research interests, or the specialties of visiting scholars. Prerequisites or background knowledge vary with the topic. Check with the department for requirements.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH429 Advanced Special Topics in Biological Anthropology (3 Credits)

Upper level biological anthropology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH435 Archaeological Ethnography and Heritage Ethnography (3 Credits)

Archaeologists and other heritage experts are increasingly incorporating ethnographic approaches as part of their methodological toolkit. This course explores key methods and frameworks in archaeological ethnography and heritage ethnography, set within the broader contexts of the historical development of anthropological theory and the current rapid growth of heritage studies as an interdisciplinary field of research and practice.Jointly offered with: ANTH635.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH435 or ANTH635.

ANTH438 Special Topics in Study Abroad IV (1-6 Credits)

Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

Repeatable to: 15 credits if content differs.

ANTH440 Theory and Practice of Historical Archaeology (3 Credits)

Historical archaeology enhances cultural heritage by providing voice for groups who were often unable to record their own histories, such as women, laborers, working class families, and enslaved people. The course provides insight into issues related to race, gender, and ethnicity as they relate to multicultural histories.

Prerequisite: ANTH240. Jointly offered with ANTH640. Credit only grant ed for: ANTH440 or ANTH640.

ANTH441 Archaeology of Diaspora (3 Credits)

"Diaspora" is defined, theorized, deconstructed, and employed throughout the social sciences. There are context specific relations that define who leaves, when, and how they are received in the new place of settlement. Over the course of the semester the class will actively and critically examine the relevance of historical archaeology and material culture studies in the understanding of the formation, experiences, and transformation of diasporic groups over time and space.

Prerequisite: ANTH240.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH448A, ANTH688Z, or ANTH441.

Formerly: ANTH448A.

ANTH442 Public Archeology (3 Credits)

Explores the uses and environments for archaeological work through a discussion of museum, electronic media, heritage settings, outdoor history museums, including the legal environment that offers protection for archaeological remains. The course exposes students to the majority of cultural media within which archaeology is currently practiced. The interdisciplinary course is a survey of the progress made within and beyond anthropology in understanding the function of heritage, public memory, tourism, and the other popular uses of materials from the past, including the progress made in linguistics psychology and other cognitive disciplines in understanding the purpose of the past.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH442, ANTH448V, or ANTH642.

Formerly: ANTH448V.

ANTH444 Theories of the Past (3 Credits)

The primary purpose is to highlight some of the key achievements made by archaeologists in informing questions of interest to society from 1850 on. Key achievements include how archaeologists understand elements of the past thought to be central to the development of modern socieity. A secondary purpose is to introduce students to the theories used to understand the place of the past in society and the function of answers to questions thought central to modern social life.

Prerequisite: ANTH240. Jointly offered with ANTH740. Credit only grant ed for: ANTH448P, ANTH444, or ANTH740.

Formerly: ANTH448P.

ANTH445 Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (3 Credits)

The processing, curation, cataloging and analysis of data is an important part of any archaeology field project. Students will learn that basics of laboratory techniques necessary for the final analysis and interpretation of field data.

Prerequisite: ANTH496.

Recommended: ANTH240.

ANTH447 Material Culture Studies in Archaeology (3 Credits)

An in-depth introduction to the world of material culture studies with a focus on the methods and theories in historical archaeology. Students will look at archaeological data as historical documents, commodities and as symbols expressing ideas.

Prerequisite: ANTH240.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH447, ANTH448C, ANTH647, or ANTH689C.

Formerly: ANTH448C.

ANTH448 Special Topics in Archaeology (3 Credits)

Advanced topics in archaeological research, corresponding to new theoretical developments, faculty research interests, or specialties of visiting scholars. Prerequisites may vary with course topic; check with the department for requirements.

Prerequisite: ANTH240.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH449 Advanced Special Topics in Archaeology (3 Credits)

Upper level archaeology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH450 Theory and Practice of Environmental Anthropology (3 Credits)

An overview of contemporary application of cultural theory and methods to environmental problems. Topics include the use of theories of culture, cognitive approaches, discourse analysis, and political ecology. Case studies from anthropology, other social sciences, humanities, conservation, and environmental history are used to demonstrate the applied value of a cultural-environmental approach.

Restriction: Junior standing or higher. Jointly offered with ANTH650.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH450 or ANTH650.

ANTH451 Environmental Archaeology (3 Credits)

An overview of modern environmental archaeology as a tool for the interdisciplinary investigation of past and present global change and to engage the long term past with current issues of sustainability and rapid environmental change.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH451, ANTH651, ANTH448F, ANTH668F.

Formerly: ANTH448F.

ANTH452 Anthropology and Climate Change (3 Credits)

Human activities now influence ongoing global climatic change, and the outcome remains uncertain for communities and cultures around the world. This interaction between humans and climate provides a rich area of study for anthropologists in an interdisciplinary context. Case studies of historic and contemporary evidence will be used to understand impacts of global climate change and assess opportunities and barriers to successful responses and adaptation.

Prerequisite: ANTH220, ANTH222, ANTH240, or ANTH260.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH452 or ANTH652.

ANTH453 Archaeology of the Modern City (3 Credits)

An overview of how social scientists, in particular historical archaeologists, approach modern cities as being part of the materiality of the social structure and order.

Prerequisite: ANTH240; or permission of instructor.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH448Q or ANTH453.

Formerly: ANTH448Q.

ANTH454 Political Ecology (3 Credits)

The use of the environment is contested and negotiated within historic and contemporary societies. Incorporating methods and perspectives from across the social sciences through specific case studies in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, this course offers a survey to coupled human-environmental systems.Jointly offered with: ANTH654.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH454 or ANTH654.

ANTH456 Conservation and Indigenous People in South America (3 Credits)

Considers indigenous peoples and their relation to the lands on which they live, issues of traditional indigenous knowledge and land management as well as new contributions by indigenous peoples to changing landscapes. Reviews legal mechanisms and instruments through which indigenous peoples have rights to the resources they occupy and utilize. Taking specific cases and examining them through the lens of political and social ecology, the role of indigenous peoples in local and worldwide conservation efforts is considered. Case studies will emphasize the indigenous peoples and conservation policies of Latin America.Jointly offered with: ANTH656.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH468L, ANTH456, ANTH688L, or ANTH656.

Formerly: ANTH468L.

ANTH461 Language as Practice (3 Credits)

An introduction to linguistic variation and the construction of identity, relationship, and community membership through language use. The approach emphasizes language as community-based practice and examines the dynamic construction of social relations through linguistic interactions.Jointly offered with: ANTH661.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH461, ANTH468I or ANTH661.

Formerly: ANTH468I.

ANTH462 Amazon Through Film (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course that utilizes film to consider the Amazon basin, its history, peoples, and landscapes through cinematic representations. The course places the films in the context of film history and critical theory. The course takes into consideration the Brazilian, North American, Mexican, European and Argentine creators of the films and their visions of Amazonia, as well as the audiences and markets to which the films are intended.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH468D or ANTH462.

Formerly: ANTH468D.

ANTH464 Anthropology of Cultural Heritage (3 Credits)

A global exploration of how the past is remade in the present. Covers the breadth of scope and specific interventions of heritage practice at the global scale, including the social, political, economic, and ethical dimensions of cultural heritage.

Prerequisite: ANTH260. Jointly offered with ANTH664. Credit only grant ed for: ANTH469T, ANTH689T, ANTH464, ANTH664.

Formerly: ANTH469T.

ANTH466 Anthropology of Work (3 Credits)

Examines the concept and meaning of work, the different types of work, and how the development of time discipline became essential for the creation of capitalist labor. Explores the contemporary social justice movement and its impact on gender and racialized inequities. Includes an exploration of deindustrialized regions in the Rust Belt.Jointly offered with: ANTH666.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH466 or ANTH666.

ANTH467 Researching Environment and Culture (3 Credits)

In this applied course, students use mixed methods to research a locally-based, environmental sustainability issue. Classroom time will be split between seminar discussions of theory, methods, and relevant case studies, and lab work focused on project development, data analysis, and report write up. Students are expected to spend additional time outside class on data collection, analysis, and writing

Recommended: ANTH322, ANTH360, ENSP101, or ENSP102.

ANTH468 Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits)

Advanced courses in varying specialty areas of cultural anthropology that respond to new theoretical developments, faculty research interests, or specialties of visiting scholars.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH469 Advanced Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits)

Upper level cultural anthropology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH472 Medical Anthropology (3 Credits)

An exploration of the cultural, social, economic and political dimensions of health, disease, and illness. These dimensions will be examined through both the health-seeker's and the care-provider's perspectives.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH472, ANTH468, ANTH672, or ANTH688L.

Formerly: ANTH468L.

ANTH473 Native American Languages and Cultures (3 Credits)

An introduction to Native American Languages and Cultures from a linguistic anthropological perspective. Topics to be explored include Native American identities, the stucture of Native languages, oral traditions, narrative story-telling, Native language and thought (Sapir/Whorf), language shift, linguistic revitalization, documentation of endangered languages, indigenous representation and appropriation, and racializing discourses.Jointly offered with: ANTH673.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH473 or ANTH673.

ANTH474 Language Racism & Identity (3 Credits)

An exploration of the relationship between language, identity and racism in a variety of social contexts, in the U.S. and elsewhere.Jointly offered with: ANTH674.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH474, ANTH469R, ANTH674, or ANTH689R.

ANTH476 Senior Research (3-4 Credits)

Capstone course in which students pursue independent research into a current problem in anthropology, selected with assistance of a committee of faculty. Research leads to the writing of a senior thesis in anthropology.

Restriction: Must be in Anthropology program.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH476 or ANTH486.

ANTH477 Senior Thesis (3-4 Credits)

Capstone course in which students write a senior thesis on independent research into a current problem in anthropology. The thesis is defined before a committee of faculty.

Prerequisite: ANTH476.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department; and must be in Anthropology program.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH477 or ANTH487.

ANTH478 Special Topics in Linguistics (3 Credits)

Advanced courses in specialty areas that respond to new theoretical developments and faculty research interests in linguistics.

Recommended: LING200.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH485 Honors Research Preparation (3 Credits)

Honors Research Preparation is an independent study course during which the Honors candidate will work with their Honors Thesis Advisor to establish not only the structure of the thesis and timeline, but also the formation of Thesis Review Committee.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department; and must be in Anthropology program; and must be admitted to University Honors Program or Anthropology Honors Program.

ANTH486 Honors Research (3-4 Credits)

Capstone course in which students pursue independent research into a current problem in anthropology, selected with assistance of a committee of faculty. Research leads to the writing of an honors thesis in anthropology.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department; and must be in Anthropology program; and must be admitted to University Honors Program or Anthropology Honors Program.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH486 or ANTH476.

ANTH487 Honors Thesis (3-4 Credits)

Capstone course in which students write a thesis on the results of independent research into a current problem in anthropology.

Prerequisite: ANTH486.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department; and must be in Anthropology program; and must be admitted to University Honors Program or Anthropology Honors Program.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH487 or ANTH477.

ANTH491 Applied Urban Ethnography (3 Credits)

The focus is on the use of applied ethnographic field methods in community assessment research in urban settings. Also, it will extend beyond most ethnographic training in which the emphasis is on being there, and relying predominantly on the classical ethnographic methods of recursive observations, participant observations, and a variety of approaches to interviewing.

Prerequisite: ANTH260. Jointly offered with ANTH617. Credit only grant ed for: ANTH468B, ANTH491, or ANTH617.

Formerly: ANTH468B.

ANTH496 Field Methods in Archaeology (6 Credits)

Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey and excavation.

ANTH498 Advanced Field Training in Ethnography (1-8 Credits)

Experience in field research utilizing a variety of ethnographic methods of inquiry.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH498 or ANTH698.

ANTH601 Applied Anthropology (3 Credits)

An overview of the history and current practices of applied anthropology. This includes relationships between applied anthropology and other major subfields of the profession; the interdisciplinary and public context of applied anthropology; and problems of significance, utility, and ethics associated with applied anthropology.

ANTH606 Qualitative Methods in Applied Anthropology (3 Credits)

An introduction to the use of ethnography and qualitative methods in applied and policy contexts. Qualitative methods discussed include informal and systematic approaches. Students undertake fieldwork in local settings to practice the qualitative methods and to develop analysis and report writing skills.

ANTH611 Anthropology of Immigration and Health (3 Credits)

The United Nations estimates that some 230 million people around the world are migrants who live outside their country of birth. This course focuses on these migrant populations, considering the implications of movement across borders and settlement in new societies on their health and well-being. We will investigate the social, political, and economic structures that shape disease and illness and produce differential access to health care for migrants. Within that context, we will explore the health effects of migration itself and particular health conditions from which migrants suffer. We will also examine how migrants interface with differently configured health care systems as well as strategies they and their advocates use to promote health and well-being.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH411 or ANTH611.

ANTH612 Hypermarginality and Urban Health (3 Credits)

Using perspectives from medical and urban anthropology, we examine the phenomenon of hypermarginality--the clustering of extreme poverty, chronic disease, addiction, violence and trauma in certain social and spatial contexts, often urban. We will explore both the broader social, political, and economic structures of exclusion that produce hypermarginality, as well as the illness experiences associated with these conditions. As we consider both social suffering and the related institutional responses, we will also discuss the role of anthropological approaches in national discussions about health inequities.Jointly offered with ANTH412.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH412 or ANTH612.

ANTH613 Health Disparities in the United States (3 Credits)

Powerful economic, political, social, and cultural forces shape who gets sick, what illnesses/diseases they get, how they are treated while seeking care, what treatment options they have, and what their ultimate health outcomes are. The goal of the course is to understand these processes through the lens of critical medical anthropologyJointly offered with ANTH413.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH413, ANTH469 Q, ANTH689Q, or ANTH613.

Formerly: ANTH689Q.

ANTH615 Advanced Studies in Global Health (3 Credits)

Extends understandings of diverse health conditions facing world populations today and the science being made around them. Critically examines key issues in global aid and public health, with an emphasis on the theories, concepts, and methods of anthropology.Jointly offered with: ANTH415.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH415 or ANTH615.

ANTH616 Anthropology of Global Violence (3 Credits)

An examination of anthropological approaches to the study of violence, drawing from key texts to analyze how violence operates along a continuum: from routine, sometimes invisible forms of violence embedded in everyday life, to more overt and exceptional forms. Consideration of the role of ethnography in elucidating both the subjective experiences of violence and the ways in which violence is embedded in institutions, structures, and global political-economic processes. Analysis of the specific relationships between violence, health, mental health, and trauma in local and global contexts.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH416 or ANTH616.

ANTH620 Environment and Society (3 Credits)

Students will obtain foundational knowledge of core theories and methods that integrate cultural and socio-economic research into environmental science. Key topics include: coupled natural and human systems, cultural models of the environment, social networks, ecological economics, political ecology, environmental justice, and science communication.Cross-listed with: MEES620.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH620 or MEES620.

Additional Information: Offered over the interactive video network.

ANTH629 Advanced Developments in Biological Anthropology (3 Credits)

Graduate biological anthropology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH429 or ANTH629.

ANTH630 Quantification and Statistics in Applied Anthropology (3 Credits)

An intensive overview of key quantitative and statistical approaches used by social scientists in applied ad policy research. This includes nonparametric and parametric statistical approaches. Students utilize statistical software and analyze existing and student-created databases. Anthropological case studies are emphasized.

Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Anthropology (Doctoral); Anthropology (Master's)).

ANTH635 Archaeological Ethnography and Heritage Ethnography (3 Credits)

Archaeologists and other heritage experts are increasingly incorporating ethnographic approaches as part of their methodological toolkit. This course explores key methods and frameworks in archaeological ethnography and heritage ethnography, set within the broader contexts of the historical development of anthropological theory and the current rapid growth of heritage studies as an interdisciplinary field of research and practice.Jointly offered with: ANTH435.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH435 or ANTH635.

ANTH640 Advanced Studies in Theory and Practice of Historical Archaeology (3 Credits)

Historical archaeology enhances cultural heritage by providing voice for groups who were often unable to record their own histories, such as women, laborers, working class families, and enslaved people. The course provides insight into issues related to race, gender, and ethnicity as they relate to multicultural histories.Jointly offered with ANTH440.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH440 or ANTH6 40.

ANTH641 Introduction to Zooarchaeology (3 Credits)

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains, especially bones, from archaeological contexts. This course will address both methodology as well as many of the main issues in contemporary zooarchaeology. Zooarchaeology stands at the intersection of a number of social and biological sciences, such as Biology, Osteology, Ecology, History, Anthropology and Economics. We will discuss basic animal osteology and the concepts and practices behind the identification of animal remains from archaeological contexts. We will cover the nature of the data in zooarchaeology, especially issues around using proxy data.Jointly offered with ANTH341.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH298D, ANTH34 1 or ANTH641.

ANTH643 Anthropological Approaches to Geographic Information Science (3 Credits)

A practical introduction to GIS program use, including the production of archaeological and other maps, profiles, and integrated presentations of plans, photographs, texts, an other digitally available materials, as well as research applications in applied biological and cultural anthropology.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH448S, ANTH643, or ANTH689S.

ANTH647 Advanced Material Culture Studies in Archaeology (3 Credits)

An in-depth introduction to the world of material culture studies with a focus on the methods and theories in historical archaeology. Students will look at archaeological data as historical documents, commodities and as symbols expressing ideas.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH447, ANTH448C, ANTH647, or ANTH689C.

Formerly: ANTH689C.

ANTH649 Advanced Developments in Archaeology (3 Credits)

Graduate Archaeology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH650 Advanced Studies in Theory and Practice of Environmental Anthropology (3 Credits)

An overview of contemporary application of cultural theory and methods to environmental problems. Topics include the use of theories of culture, cognitive approaches, discourse analysis, and political ecology. Case studies from anthropology, other social sciences, humanities, conservation, and environmental history are used to demonstrate the applied value of a cultural-environmental approach.Jointly offered with ANTH450.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH450 or ANTH6 50.

ANTH651 Environmental Archaeology (3 Credits)

An overview of modern environmental archaeology as a tool for the interdisciplinary investigation of past and present global change and to engage the long term past with current issues of sustainability and rapid environmental change.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH448F, ANTH451, ANTH688F, or ANTH651.

Formerly: ANTH688F.

ANTH652 Anthropology and Climate Change (3 Credits)

Human activities now influence ongoing global climatic change, and the outcome remains uncertain for communities and cultures around the world. This interaction between humans and climate provides a rich area of study for anthropologists in an interdisciplinary context. Case studies of historic and contemporary evidence will be used to understand impacts of global climate change and assess opportunities and barriers to successful responses and adaptation.Jointly offered with ANTH452.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH452 or ANTH6 52.

ANTH654 Political Ecology (3 Credits)

The use of the environment is contested and negotiated within historic and contemporary societies. Incorporating methods and perspectives from across the social sciences through specific case studies in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, this course offers a survey to coupled human-environmental systems.Jointly offered with: ANTH454.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH454 or ANTH654.

ANTH655 Introduction to Museum Scholarship (3 Credits)

Provides students a basic understanding of museums as cultural and intellectual institutions. Topics include the historical development of museums, museums as resources for scholarly study, and the museum exhibition as medium for presentation of scholarship.Cross-listed with AMST655, HIST610.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH655, AMST655, or HIST610.

ANTH661 Language as Practice (3 Credits)

An introduction to linguistic variation and the construction of identity, relationship, and community membership through language use. The approach emphasizes language as community-based practice and examines the dynamic construction of social relations through linguistic interactions.Jointly offered with: ANTH461.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH468I, ANTH461, or ANTH661.

ANTH664 Anthropology of Cultural Heritage (3 Credits)

A global exploration of how the past is remade in the present. Covers the breadth of scope and specific interventions of heritage practice at the global scale, including the social, political, economic, and ethical dimensions of cultural heritage.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH469T, ANTH689T, ANTH464 or ANTH664.

Formerly: ANTH689T.

ANTH665 Method & Theory in Medical Anthropology and Global Health (3 Credits)

Provides a critical perspective to global health that encompasses key political, economic, and cultural factors associated with the nature and magnitude of global health issues such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, paying particular attention to how poverty and inequalities within and between societies has accelerated current global health challenges. Introduces students to how medical anthropologists have contributed to the debates surrounding the globalization of health.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH310, ANTH465 or ANTH665.

ANTH666 Anthropology of Work (3 Credits)

Examines the concept and meaning of work, the different types of work, and how the development of time discipline became essential for the creation of capitalist labor. Explores the contemporary social justice movement and its impact on gender and racialized inequities. Includes an exploration of deindustrialized regions in the Rust Belt.Jointly offered with: ANTH466.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH466 or ANTH666.

ANTH669 Advanced Developments in Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits)

Graduate cultural anthropology courses on varying topics derived from new interests of the faculty or the specialties of visiting scholars.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

ANTH672 Advanced Studies in Medical Anthropology (3 Credits)

An exploration of the cultural, social, economic and political dimensions of health, disease, and illness. These dimensions will be examined through both the health-seeker's and the care-provider's perspectives.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH472, ANTH468L, ANTH672, or ANTH688L.

Formerly: ANTH688L.

ANTH673 Native American Languages and Cultures (3 Credits)

An introduction to Native American Languages and Cultures from a linguistic anthropological perspective. Topics to be explored include Native American identities, the stucture of Native languages, oral traditions, narrative story-telling, Native language and thought (Sapir/Whorf), language shift, linguistic revitalization, documentation of endangered languages, indigenous representation and appropriation, and racializing discourses.Jointly offered with: ANTH473.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH673 or ANTH473.

ANTH674 Language Racism & Identity (3 Credits)

This course explores the relationship between language, identity and racism in a variety of social contexts, in the U.S. and elsewhere.Jointly offered with: ANTH474.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH474, ANTH469R, ANTH674, or ANTH689R.

ANTH688 Current Developments in Anthropology (3 Credits)

Detailed investigation of a current problem or research technique, the topic to be chosen in accordance with faculty interests and student needs.

Repeatable to: 9 credits if content differs.

ANTH689 Special Problems in Anthropology (1-6 Credits)

ANTH692 Anthropology of the Immigrant Life Course (4 Credits)

Explores social issues affecting local immigrant populations through readings, research and service learning. Theorizing immigration as a social policy issue in the U.S. culture, students learn about the specific contributions that anthropology has made to the understanding of immigration: globalization on the one hand, and the context of daily life in local neighborhoods on the other.Jointly offered with ANTH492.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH 492, ANTH69 2, ANTH498N, ANTH689N.

Formerly: ANTH689N.

ANTH696 Field Methods in Archaeology (6 Credits)

Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey and excavation.

Formerly: ANTH699.

ANTH698 Advanced Field Training in Ethnology (1-6 Credits)

Experience in field research utilizing a variety of enthnographic methods of inquiry.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH498 or ANTH698.

ANTH701 Anthropology Internship Preparation (3 Credits)

Preparation for internship includes practicum training in development, presentation and evaluation of position papers, proposals and work plans; literature search and use of secondary data sources in decision making the effect cultural analysis and resource management; ethics and professional development for work in non-academic settings.

ANTH712 Anthropology Internship Analysis (3 Credits)

The preparation and presentation of internship results, and the development of skills in report writing and presentation. Includes the completion of a professional quality report or publishable paper based on the internship experience.

Prerequisite: ANTH789.

ANTH722 Ecological Anthropology (3 Credits)

An overview of important approaches to ecological anthropology. Population, systems, community, political, behavioral and evolutionary ecology will be examined as they have been applied to a range of anthropological questions. Complexity theory (nonlinear dynamics) and topics in game theory will also be addressed. Students will map the field of ecological anthropology and to assess the strengths and weaknesses of contemporary approaches, methods and theories.

Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Anthropology (Doctoral); Anthropology (Master's)).

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH720 or ANTH722.

ANTH740 Theories of the Past and Accomplishments of Archaeology (3 Credits)

The primary purpose is to highlight some of the key achievements made by archaeologists in informing questions of interest to society from 1850 on. Key achievements include how archaeologists understand elements of the past thought to be central to the development of modern socieity. A secondary purpose is to introduce students to the theories used to understand the place of the past in society and the function of answers to questions thought central to modern social life.

Credit Only Granted for: ANTH689P or ANTH740.

Formerly: ANTH689P.

ANTH741 Introduction to Cultural and Heritage Resource Management (3 Credits)

An introduction to the field of cultural and heritage resource management. Examines existing international, national, and local frameworks for the protection of cultural heritage. Provides an overview of employment opportunities and ethical responsibilities within the profession.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Master or Post-Baccalaureate Certificate of Professional Studies Programs; or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH742 Advanced Methods in Cultural and Heritage Resource Managment (3 Credits)

An examination of the range of nondestructive technologies used to research and image cultural and heritage resources. Standard archaeological survey methods will be covered and will focus on remote sensing technologies and how an integrated approach to archaeological investigation can reveal vital information for resource planning, interpretation, and outreach.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM); or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH743 Community Engagement and Consultation (3 Credits)

A grounding in cultural communication and sensitivity to community, cultural, and stakeholder needs within and beyond project specific confines. Using the broader context of practicing anthropology in the exploration of communication styles, learning styles, and cultural biases and taboos, students are exposed to underlying concepts concerning inter-cultural communication so that they may develop more collaborative approaches to research. The program also provides background in the development of public outreach programs in the context of cultural and heritage resource management.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM); or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH744 Collections, Data Management and Cultural Materials Preservation (3 Credits)

An overview of the process of collecting cultural materials and samples with the goal of obtaining as much information during analysis as possible followed by content relating to archaeological curation and collections management. Provides information on the preservation of cultural materials from the time they leave the field until they are placed in a certified collections facility.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM); or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH745 International Heritage Management (3 Credits)

An examination of international heritage management practices and global ethical and professional norms in order to contextualize domestic cultural resource management in the US. The survey will also explore the linkages and areas for growth between international and domestic heritage practice.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM); or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH746 Applied Archaeological Theory (3 Credits)

Does cultural and heritage resources management (CHRM) need theory? Can archeological theory help us understand CHRM conventions and configurations, and does CHRM have its own distinctive contribution to make to archaeological theory? This course explores these questions while surveying the key areas of theory that inform the work that CHRM practitioners do, and also the place of CHRM in cultural discourse.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM); or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH747 The Business of Cultural & Heritage Resource Management (3 Credits)

An overview of the skills necessary for success in managing a CHRM program. Students will learn how CHRM organizations market and manage clients, prepare and submit budgets and proposals, and coordinate technical staff to successfully complete projects. Topics will address the range of issues that owners and managers are confronted with in their oversight of projects, including the management of employees, ethics and professional responsibilities, ensuring health and safety, and meeting the many contractual obligations of CHRM projects.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Masters Program (MPCH) or certificate (Z121) ; or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH748 CHRM Project Management (3 Credits)

This capstone class for the MPS in CHRM provides students with a grounding in the critical thinking processes necessary during each stage of the CRHM process. It provides students with insights into the processes used as research questions are translated into data and then into an evaluative report. Students review examples of appropriate and inappropriate technical reports and then analyze the reports to understand the thinking processes necessary for project management to provide the client with the documentation necessary for completing the compliance process.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Master's Program (MPCH) or certificate (Z121) ; or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH749 Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Internship (1-6 Credits)

An internship/practicum that would contribute to students' understanding of the overall process of CHRM. Students who are already working in CRM or a closely related field may use their employment as their practicum if the opportunity is available for them to learn beyond their current job duties.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Program (CHRM).

Repeatable to: 12 credits if content differs.

ANTH751 CHRM Project Management (3 Credits)

This capstone class for the MPS in CHRM provides students with a grounding in the critical thinking processes necessary during each stage of the CRHM process. It provides students with insights into the processes used as research questions are translated into data and then into an evaluative report. Students review examples of appropriate and inappropriate technical reports and then analyze the reports to understand the thinking processes necessary for project management to provide the client with the documentation necessary for completing the compliance process.

Restriction: Must be in the Cultural and Heritage Resource Management Master's Program (MPCH) or certificate (Z121) ; or by permission of the Anthropology department.

ANTH760 Development of Social/Cultural Theory (3 Credits)

A broad perspective of the history of social cultural theory in anthropology and the critical skills needed for understanding the subdiscipline is provided. An overview of the history of theorizing about society and culture will help outline the past, present, and future of anthropology and its relations with other scientific and humanistic disciplines.

ANTH788 Internship Research (1-3 Credits)

This course augments ANTH 789 and is graded in conjunction with it.

Prerequisite: ANTH701.

Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Anthropology department; and must be in one of the following programs (Anthropology (Master's); Anthropology (Doctoral)).

ANTH789 Internship (3-6 Credits)

Individual instruction course supervised by a department faculty member.

Prerequisite: ANTH701.

Repeatable to: 6 credits if content differs.

Formerly: ANTH705.

ANTH799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6 Credits)

ANTH856 Museum Research Seminar (3 Credits)

A research seminar focusing on the practice and presentation of cultural and historical scholarship in museums and historical sites. Students will complete an original research project on the challenges and opportunities of public exhibition and interpretation of cultural and historical research.

Prerequisite: AMST655, ANTH655, or HIST610. Cross-listed with HIST810, AMST856.

Credit Only Granted for: AMST856, ANTH856, or HIST810.

ANTH857 Museum Scholarship Practicum (3-6 Credits)

Students devise and carry out a research program using the collections at the Smithsonian Institution or some other cooperating museum, working under joint supervision of a museum professional and a university faculty member.

Prerequisite: AMST856, ANTH856, or HIST810.

Restriction: Permission of Museum Scholarship Program required. Cross-listed with HIST811, AMST857.

Credit Only Granted for: AMST857, ANTH857, or HIST811.

ANTH898 Pre-Candidacy Research (1-8 Credits)

ANTH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-6 Credits)