Academic Records and Regulations

The Office of the Registrar, located on the first floor of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Building, is responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official transcripts.

Absences, Assessment, Attendance, and Syllabus

Absences

Absences from courses in which in-class participation forms a significant part of the work of the course (such as lab or discussion courses) shall be handled by instructors in accordance with the general policies of their academic units.

An excused absence is an absence for which the student has the right to receive, and the instructor has the responsibility to provide, academic accommodation.

Excused absences must be requested promptly and must be supported by appropriate documentation. Excused absences do not alter the academic requirements for the course. Students are responsible for information and material missed on the day of absence. Students are within reason entitled to receive any materials provided to the class during the absence. Students are responsible for determining what course material they have missed and for completing required exercises in a timely manner.

Events that justify an excused absence include:

  • religious observances;
  • mandatory military obligation;
  • illness of the student or illness of an immediate family member;
  • participation in university activities at the request of university authorities; and
  • compelling circumstances beyond the student’s control (e.g., death in the family, required court appearance).

Absences stemming from work duties other than military obligation (e.g., unexpected changes in shift assignments) and traffic/transit problems do not typically qualify for excused absence.

Students claiming excused absence must notify the course instructor in a timely manner and provide appropriate documentation. The notification should be provided either prior to the absence or as soon afterwards as possible. In the case of religious observances, athletic events, and planned absences known at the beginning of the semester, the student must inform the instructor during the schedule adjustment period. All other absences must be reported as soon as is practical. The student must provide appropriate documentation of the absence. The documentation must be provided in writing to the instructor by the means specified in the syllabus.

  1. For medically necessitated absences: Students may, one time per course per semester, provide a self-signed excuse as documentation of an absence from a single class (e.g., lecture, recitation, or laboratory session) that does not coincide with a major assessment or assignment due date. For all other medically necessitated absences, students must provide documentation from a physician or the University Health Center, upon request of the course instructor.
  2. For all other absences students must provide verifiable documentation upon request (e.g., religious calendar, court summons, death announcement, etc.).

In keeping with USM policy, students shall not be penalized because of observances of their religious holidays and shall be given an opportunity, whenever feasible, to make up within a reasonable time any academic assignment that is missed due to individual participation in religious observances. For all other excused absences, the student must be provided academic accommodation. The accommodation provided should, within reason, neither advantage nor disadvantage either the student or the rest of the class.

If the accommodation is a makeup assessment, it must be timely, at a time and place agreed upon by the instructor and student, cover the same material, and be at the same level of difficulty as the original assessment. In the event that a group of students requires the same makeup assessment, one time and place may be scheduled. The makeup assessment must not interfere with the student's regularly scheduled classes. If makeup work is not feasible, an alternate accommodation for excused absences will be provided. Alternate accommodations will be according to the principles established by the unit offering the course. Students who miss a substantial number of class sessions or course assignments should seek guidance from an academic advisor with respect to academic options.

Extended absences stemming from active military duty are addressed in the USM V-7.00 Policy on Students who are called to Active Military Duty during a National or International Crisis or Conflict. Absences related to a student’s disability are addressed in the VI-1.00(D) University of Maryland Disability & Accessibility Policy and Procedures.

Although the university attempts to accommodate the religious beliefs of all of its members, it functions within a secular environment and is limited in the extent to which it can interrupt its normal operations. The president shall determine when it is appropriate for the campus community to restrict rescheduling examinations or other significant assessments on the dates of religious observance.

Assessment

Students can expect to receive a reasonable number of graded assessments or progress reports to permit evaluation of their performance. These assessments shall be returned to the students in a timely manner. Students will have reasonable opportunity to review graded assignments, such as papers and examinations (including the final examination or assessment), after evaluation by the instructor and while materials are reasonably current. Information about assessments and determination of the final course grade will be presented in a course syllabus.

Ordinarily, in-class assessments are given during class hours in accordance with the regularly scheduled time and place of each course. Students are responsible for knowing the information in the syllabus, including dates of assessments and due dates of graded assignments. Assessments may take a variety of forms and need not be classroom-based written examinations.

Final Examination: There shall be a final examination and/or assessment in every undergraduate course. Exceptions may be made with the written approval of the department chair or other appropriate unit administrator.

Each faculty member shall retain, for one full semester (either fall or spring) after a course is ended, the students’ final assessments in the appropriate medium. If a faculty member goes on leave for a semester or longer, or leaves the university, the faculty member shall leave the final assessments and grade records for the course with the department chair, the program director, or the dean of the College or School, as appropriate.

All in-class final examinations must be held on the date and at the time listed in the official final examination schedule. Out-of-class final examination or equivalent assessments shall be due on the date and at a time listed in the official final examination schedule. Changes to final examination schedules and locations must be approved by the chair of the department or the dean of the College, or the appropriate designee. However, final examinations or assessments may not be rescheduled to the final week of classes or to Reading Day.

Students may seek to reschedule final examinations so that they have no more than three examinations on any given day. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the rescheduling or be responsible for taking the examination as originally scheduled. When rescheduling is desired, students should first contact their instructors. Students who encounter difficulty rescheduling examinations with their instructors are advised to contact the dean's office of their academic program for help. Faculty members are expected to accommodate students with legitimate rescheduling requests.

Attendance

Students are expected to take full responsibility for their own academic work and progress. Students, to progress satisfactorily, must meet all of the requirements of each course for which they are registered. Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Consistent attendance offers students the most effective opportunity to gain command of course concepts and materials.

In-class participation may be an ongoing requirement and an integral part of the work of some courses. In-class assessments may occur, sometimes without advance notice. The syllabus will specify expectations about in-class participation and its relationship to the final course grade.

Except in cases where in-class participation forms a significant part of the work of the course, attendance should not be used in the computation of grades; assignment of a course grade on some basis other than performance in the course is prohibited by University policy. Recording student attendance is not required of the faculty.

Syllabus

There shall be a complete course syllabus for the current term made available to students no later than the first day of class at the beginning of each undergraduate course. Any changes to the syllabus made after the first day of class must be announced and must be clearly represented with the date of the revision. The course syllabus will specify in general terms:

  • a course description including course objectives;
  • the content and nature of assignments;
  • the schedule of major graded assessments (e.g., examinations and due dates for projects and papers);
  • the examination and/or assessment procedures;
  • the mode of communication for excused absences;
  • the basis for determining final grades, including if the plus/minus grading system will be used and the relationship between in-class participation and the final course grade;
  • reference to the list of course-related policies maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

Resolution of Problems

Any concerns regarding the syllabus, attendance, absences and assessment should be addressed to the course instructor. In the case of unresolved concerns, students are encouraged to consult the following policies for appropriate resolution.

Relevant University Policies:


Academic Clemency

III-1.30(A) University of Maryland Policy and Procedures on Academic Clemency (Approved by the President August 1, 1991, Amended April 21, 2016)

Undergraduate degree-seeking students who have re-enrolled at the University of Maryland in pursuit of their initial baccalaureate degree are eligible, after a separation of at least five calendar years from the University (determined by the last day of the last attended semester), for academic clemency. Academic clemency is granted one time only, and subsequent requests will be denied.

Application for academic clemency must be filed with the Office of Undergraduate Studies (or designee) as soon as possible, and before the end of the first semester of the student’s return to the University. Clemency will be recorded on the student’s record following the completion of the student’s first semester of re-enrollment. Under clemency, up to 16 attempted credits of D+, D, D-, and F grades from courses previously completed at the University of Maryland will be removed from the calculation of the student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA).

Attempted credits and grades for which clemency is granted will:

  1. remain on the student’s transcript;
  2. not be used to satisfy degree requirements;
  3. be excluded from the student’s cumulative GPA calculation;
  4. remain included in the calculation of Latin Honors; and
  5. adhere to the institution’s repeat guidelines and be included in the student’s repeat limits.

The granting of clemency is contingent upon the student’s satisfactory completion of the initial semester of re-enrollment, and will be recorded by the university at that time. If the student’s first semester of registration upon re-enrollment is canceled, or the student withdraws from the semester, clemency will not be granted (and the student will retain the option of filing for clemency in the future).

Refer to policy for details:  http://president.umd.edu/administration/policies/section-iii-academic-affairs/iii-130a


Academic Dismissal and Probation

Consistent with the University of Maryland Student Academic Success - Degree Completion Policy, it is the intent of the University that its students make satisfactory progress toward their degree objectives, and achieve academic success. If a student has special circumstances that make it impossible to complete a normal course load, the student must meet with an advisor to discuss the circumstances, the student's plans for continued progress toward a degree, and the implications for continued enrollment.

The following guidelines for retention of students refer separately to semester (Fall and Spring) and Winter or Summer terms:

  1. Academic retention is based solely on grade point average (GPA). A minimum of 120 successfully completed course credits is required for graduation in any degree curriculum. Individual colleges, schools, and departments may establish higher requirements for graduation. Students must consult the appropriate college, school, or department for specific information.
  2. Satisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Students whose semester GPA falls below 2.0 are encouraged to meet with their advisors regarding the development of a plan that will appropriately respond to the student's academic difficulties and lead to academic improvement. Individual colleges, schools and departments may establish separate requirements for mandatory advising. Students must consult the appropriate college, school, or department for specific information.
  3. Unsatisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. Students will be placed on Academic Probation following any semester in which a 2.0 cumulative GPA is not achieved. Normally, students will be placed on Academic Dismissal if they are unable to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 or higher at the end of their probationary semester.

Academic Dismissal

  1. Students who have earned 60 or more credits will be dismissed if their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters (excluding winter and summer terms). Students who attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal.
  2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits will be dismissed following any probationary semester in which they fail to attain a minimum 2.0 semester GPA and complete the requisite credits detailed under Academic Probation. Students who attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal.
  3. Students who have been academically dismissed and who are reinstated will be academically dismissed again if a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is not achieved by the end of the first semester after reinstatement. Reinstated students will not be allowed to add or drop courses, or to register during any semester without the approval of an academic advisor in their college, unless a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is achieved.
  4. The Office of the Registrar will notify the appropriate University offices when students are academically dismissed and will note the dismissal on the student's academic record.
  5. The Student Success Office will notify students via email. The email will include a statement that registration for the next semester (excluding winter or summer terms) will be canceled.

Academic Probation

Students will be placed on academic probation if their cumulative GPA falls below 2.0. Normally, a student is expected to attain a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of any probationary semester. Students who fail to achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of their probationary semester may be academically dismissed, depending on their credit level as detailed below.

  1. Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be dismissed from the University in the event their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 at the end of their probationary semester. Students who are on probation and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in the subsequent semester.
  2. Students who are on academic probation and have earned fewer than 60 credits will be permitted to continue on academic probation if a minimum semester GPA of 2.0 is achieved in each semester of probation.
    1. Full-time students must complete 9 or more credits in each semester of probation. A completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which a student receives a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-. F, P, or S.
    2. Students who meet this requirement will be permitted to continue on probation until the close of the semester (excluding winter and summer terms) in which they attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0.
    3. However, students who are on probation will be dismissed if they have not achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the semester in which they complete 60 credits.
    4. Students who are on probation and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in the subsequent semester.
  3. The Office of the Registrar will notify students when they are placed on academic probation. Such notices will include a requirement that the students consult an academic advisor in their colleges early in the probationary semester and in no event later than the beginning of the early registration period for the next semester. The Office of the Registrar will notify the colleges of students who are placed on academic probation and will note the academic probationary status on the students' academic record.
    1. The academic advisors will assist students in developing appropriate plans for achieving satisfactory academic performance.
    2. Students who are placed on probation will not be allowed to add or drop courses, or register without the approval of an academic advisor in their college.

Application for Academic Reinstatement

  1. Students who have been dismissed may apply to the Faculty Petition Board for reinstatement on the grounds of mitigating circumstance.
  2. The application for reinstatement must include a written statement explaining the circumstances leading to dismissal and a proposed plan to remedy those circumstances. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisors prior to submitting their applications to the Faculty Petition Board.
  3. Applications for reinstatement can be completed at http://studentsuccess.umd.edu/.

Dismissal of Delinquent Students

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities of the university. Additional information about the dismissal of delinquent students may be found in the Code of Student Conduct.

Faculty Petition Board

  1. The Student Success Office is responsible for submitting the reinstatement applications for review to the Faculty Petition Board, which is comprised of faculty appointed by the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. The Board is the sole arbiter of reinstatement applications.
  2. The Faculty Petition Board has the discretion to establish the terms for reinstatement, including the requirements for achieving academic improvement and developing an academic plan for success.
  3. The Student Success Office will forward the Board's decision to students at the email address supplied on the application.

Computation of Grade Point Average

GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points accumulated in courses for which a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, or XF has been assigned by the total number of credits attempted in those courses. Courses for which a mark of P, S, I, NGR or W has been assigned are not included in computing the GPA. Each letter grade has a numerical value: A+=4, A=4, A- = 3.7; B+=3.3, B=3, B- = 2.7; C+=2.3, C=2, C- = 1.7; D+=1.3, D=1, D- = 0.7; F = 0. Multiplying this value by the number of credits for a particular course gives the number of quality points earned for that course.

See Repeat Course Guidelines to determine the effect of repeated courses in the calculation of GPA.


Election to Phi Beta Kappa

Organized in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely respected academic honorary society in the United States. Invitation to membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of the liberal arts and sciences. Student members are chosen entirely on the basis of academic excellence; neither extracurricular leadership nor service to the community is considered. Election is held twice a year, once in the fall and once in the spring semester.

The process for election to Phi Beta Kappa involves a review in November for those who graduated the previous August or those who will graduate in December, and a review in March for those graduating in May. For juniors the review occurs in March. The review is conducted by a select committee of faculty members representing the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The committee reviews transcripts of all students with qualifying grade point averages. Whether a student qualifies for membership in Phi Beta Kappa depends on the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record in liberal courses. The final decision for election rests with the faculty committee and faculty Phi Beta Kappa members.

Requirements for consideration of membership in Phi Beta Kappa at the University of Maryland, College Park campus chapter include:

  1. Grade Point Average: For seniors a grade point average of at least 3.75 overall as well as in all liberal arts and sciences courses taken. For juniors the minimum grade point average is at least 3.85. National PBK rules, however, require that no more than 20 percent of the students elected in any one year can be juniors, so the actual minimum grade point average for junior admission may be higher than 3.85.
  2. Residence: At least 60 credit hours must be taken at the University of Maryland, College Park.
  3. Liberal Courses: For seniors, at least 90 credit hours in courses in the liberal arts and sciences (where "liberal" courses are to be distinguished from professional or technical courses), at least 45 of which must be taken at the University of Maryland, College Park. For juniors, at least 75 total credit hours must be completed, at least 60 of which are in courses in the liberal arts and sciences; of these, at least 45 must be taken at the University of Maryland, College Park. Students would ordinarily be majors in one of the programs in the liberal arts and sciences. However, students with the requisite number of liberal credit hours can be admitted if they have completed at least 5 courses (15 credit hours or more) for seniors and for juniors in a single liberal arts and sciences department/program at UMCP.
  4. Required courses: One semester of mathematics, which must be fulfilled by college-level credit hours (including AP or IB credit, but not exemption by SAT), and two college semesters of the same foreign language at the elementary level, or at least one semester above that level. The language requirement may also be satisfied by completion of four years of the same language other than English at the high-school level or above, or the equivalent. Students with such a foreign language background who wish to be considered for admission to Phi Beta Kappa should notify the Phi Beta Kappa office (2110 Marie Mount Hall) in writing and provide the appropriate documentation (an official high school transcript) prior to the month of consideration. Juniors providing late documentation (after March 1) will be considered only as seniors.
  5. Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi Beta Kappa must contain at least nine liberal arts credit hours in each of the three following areas:
    1. arts and humanities,
    2. behavioral and social sciences,
    3. natural sciences and mathematics (including a laboratory science course).
      The laboratory science course cannot be fulfilled by AP or IB credit. All the courses in at least two of the three required areas must be completed at the University of Maryland, College Park, and in the remaining area no more than one AP or IB course can be used to fulfill the requirement. In general, Phi Beta Kappa will accept the General Education classification of courses. AP or IB History courses will be considered as satisfying only the arts and humanities requirement.

Students with more challenging courses and moderately high grade point averages are preferred by the committee to those with higher grade point averages but a narrow range of courses. Minimal qualifications in more than one area may preclude election to Phi Beta Kappa.

Recommended Criteria Include:

  • Regular grades (rather than pass/fail) in mathematics, foreign language courses, and distribution areas.
  • Some traditional social sciences and humanities courses that require written essays and papers. (Note that internships may be counted as professional courses and not as liberal courses).

Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi Beta Kappa. The judgment of the resident faculty members of Phi Beta Kappa on the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record is the deciding factor in every case. Any questions about criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (including equivalency examinations in foreign languages) should be directed to the Phi Beta Kappa Office, Dr. Denis Sullivan, and 301-405-8986.


Graduation Applications and Latin Honors

Graduation Applications

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application with the Office of the Registrar. The deadline for application is the end of the schedule adjustment period for the semester in which the student plans to graduate, or at the end of the first week of the second summer session for August degrees.

In all cases, graduation applications must be filed at the beginning of the student's final semester before receiving a degree. The graduation applications are available on the internet at www.testudo.umd.edu or at the Office of the Registrar, 1st floor Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Building.

Latin Honors

Summa cum laude, magna cum laude and cum laude are the highest Latin honors that the University bestows for sustained excellence in scholarship. They are awarded to the top 10% of all students graduating in each College or School. Summa cum laude is awarded to students with a GPA equal to or greater than the highest two percent of GPAs from the specific College or School averaged over the previous academic year, magna cum laude to the next highest three percent, and cum laude to the following five percent. To be eligible for this recognition, at least 60 semester hours must be earned at the University or at a program in which credit earned is counted as University of Maryland, College Park, resident credit (contact the Office of the Registrar to determine program eligibility). No more than 6 credits taken pass/fail or satisfactory/fail grade modes shall count toward the 60-hour minimum. No student with a grade-point average of less than 3.3 will be considered for a Latin honor. See the Office of the Registrar's website (www.registrar.umd.edu) for a list of minimum GPA cut-offs (for the current year) for each honor designation, published by College or School.


Honors (Dean's List)

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) are awarded to students who - within any given semester (excluding winter and summer terms) - complete 12 or more credits with a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher. This recognition is noted on the student's academic record.

Please Note: Courses with grades of P and S are excluded from the calculation.


Incompletes

The mark of 'I' is an exceptional mark that is an instructor option. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other circumstances beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable to complete some small portion of the work of the course. In no case will the mark 'I' be recorded for a student who has not completed the major portion of the work of the course.

  1. This Incomplete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of the college offering the course within six weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade hasn't already been submitted). If any Incomplete Contract isn't completed within the six week period, the instructor will convert the 'I' to the appropriate grade.
  2. The student will remove the 'I' by completing work assigned by the instructor; it is the student's responsibility to request arrangements for the completion of the work. The work must be completed by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no later than one year. If the remaining work for the course as defined by the contract is not completed on schedule, the instructor will convert the 'I' to the grade indicated by the contract.
  3. Exceptions to the stated deadline may be granted by the student's dean (in negotiation with the faculty member or the faculty member's dean) upon the written request of the student if circumstances warrant further delay.
  4. If the instructor is unavailable, the department chair, upon request of the student will make appropriate arrangements for the student to complete the course requirements.
  5. It is the responsibility of the instructor or department chair concerned to submit the grade promptly upon completion of the conditions of the Incomplete Contract.
  6. The 'I' cannot be removed through re-registration for the course or through credit by examination. An 'I' mark is not used in the computation of quality points or cumulative grade point averages.

Marking System

The following symbols are used on the student's permanent record for all courses in which the student is enrolled after the initial registration and schedule adjustment period: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, XF, I, P, S, W, and AU. These marks remain as part of the student's permanent record and may be changed only by the original instructor on certification, approved by the department chair and the dean, that an actual mistake was made in determining or recording the grade.

  • A+, A, A- denotes excellent mastery of the subject and outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester averages, a grade of A+ or A will be assigned a value of 4.0 quality points per credit hour. A grade of A- will be assigned 3.7 quality points per credit hour.
  • B+, B, B- denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship. A grade of B+ is assigned a value of 3.3 quality points per hour. A grade of B is assigned a value of 3.0 quality points per credit hour. A grade of B- is assigned a value of 2.7 quality points per hour.
  • C+, C, C- denotes acceptable mastery of the subject. A grade of C+ is assigned a value of 2.3 quality points per hour. A grade of C is assigned a value of 2.0 points per credit hour. A grade of C- is assigned a value of 1.7 quality points per credit hour.
  • D+, D, D- denotes borderline understanding of the subject, marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory progress toward a degree. A grade of D+ is assigned 1.3 points per credit hour. A grade of D is assigned a value of 1.0 quality point per credit hour. A grade of D- is assigned 0.7 quality points per credit.
  • F denotes failure to understand the subject and unsatisfactory performance. A grade of F is assigned a value of 0.0 quality points per credit hour.
  • XF denotes failure due to academic dishonesty. An XF is treated in the same way as F for the purposes of cumulative average.
  • The mark of 'I' is an exceptional mark that is an instructor option. It is only given to a student whose work has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other circumstances beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable to complete some small portion of the work of the course. In no case will the mark 'I' be recorded for a student who has not completed the major portion of the work of the course. For further explanation see "Incompletes" below.
  • The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to a grade of D- or better. This grade is not used in any computation of quality points or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester. The student must inform the Office of the Registrar of the selection of this option by the end of the schedule adjustment period. For a full explanation see "Pass-Fail Policy" below.
  • S is a department option mark that may be used to denote satisfactory performance by a student in progressing thesis projects, orientation courses, practice teaching, and the like. In computation of cumulative averages a mark of S will not be included.
  • W is used to indicate withdrawal from a course after the end of the schedule adjustment period. For information and completeness, the grade of W is placed on the student's permanent record by the Office of the Registrar. The instructor will be notified that the student has withdrawn from the course. This grade is not used in any computation of quality points or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester.
  • AU denotes a student registering to audit a course or courses which have been designated as available under the audit option and in which space is available. The notation AU will be placed on the transcript for each course audited. A notation to the effect that this symbol does not imply attendance or any other effort in the course will be included on the transcript in the explanation of the grading system.

Refer to policy for details:  http://www.president.umd.edu/administration/policies/section-iii-academic-affairs/iii-600a

Additional Record Notations

In addition to the above marks, there are provisions for other record or transcript notations that may be used based on university policy and individual circumstances.

Duplicate Course

Used to indicate two courses with the same course content. The second course is counted in the cumulative totals unless an exception is made by the dean.

Excluded Credit (Excl Crd)

Excluded credit is noted when academic clemency has been granted.

Incompletes

The mark of 'I' is an exceptional mark that is an instructor option. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other circumstances beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable to complete some small portion of the work of the course. In no case will the mark 'I' be recorded for a student who has not completed the major portion of the work of the course.

  1. This Incomplete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of the college offering the course within six weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade hasn't already been submitted). If any Incomplete Contract isn't completed within the six week period, the instructor will convert the 'I' to the appropriate grade.
  2. The student will remove the 'I' by completing work assigned by the instructor; it is the student's responsibility to request arrangements for the completion of the work. The work must be completed by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no later than one year. If the remaining work for the course as defined by the contract is not completed on schedule, the instructor will convert the 'I' to the grade indicated by the contract.
  3. Exceptions to the stated deadline may be granted by the student's dean (in negotiation with the faculty member or the faculty member's dean) upon the written request of the student if circumstances warrant further delay.
  4. If the instructor is unavailable, the department chair, upon request of the student will make appropriate arrangements for the student to complete the course requirements.
  5. It is the responsibility of the instructor or department chair concerned to submit the grade promptly upon completion of the conditions of the Incomplete Contract.
  6. The 'I' cannot be removed through re-registration for the course or through credit by examination. An 'I' mark is not used in the computation of quality points or cumulative grade point averages.

Mid-Term Grades

Mid-Term Grades shall be submitted for undergraduate students as detailed below. These grades are an important component of student success, as they provide timely feedback to students about the University’s academic expectations. Mid-term Grades are used to inform students of their performance in the course during roughly the first half of the semester; they are used for advising purposes and are not recorded on the student’s academic transcript.

  1. Mid-Term Grades must be submitted for all of the following:
    1. Undergraduate students enrolled in their first year (fewer than 30 credits earned at the University of Maryland),
    2. Undergraduate students in all 0xx, 1xx, and 2xx level courses,
    3. Student athletes in undergraduate courses.
  2. Mid-Term Grades are due eight (8) weeks after the start of the semester.
  3. Department Chair or Unit Head must approve any courses for which Mid-Term Grades cannot be issued.
  4. Instructors who have students who require Mid-Term Grades will be prompted to submit Mid-Term Grades. If instructors do not have such students, they will not need to submit Mid-Term Grades.
  5. Mid-Term Grades should be issued in the grading mode for the course.
  6. Satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) marks may be used.
  7. All Mid-Term Grades must be submitted as specified by the Office of the Registrar.

Refer to policy for details:  http://www.president.umd.edu/administration/policies/section-iii-academic-affairs/iii-600b


Pass-Fail Grading

The following Pass-Fail policy was approved by the Board of Regents for implementation beginning with the Spring 1989 semester:

  1. To register for a course under the pass-fail option, an undergraduate must have completed 30 or more credit hours of college credit with a GPA of at least 2.0. At least 15 of these credit hours must have been completed at the University of Maryland, College Park with a University of Maryland GPA of at least 2.0.
  2. Courses for which this option applies must be electives in the student's program. The courses may not be college, major, field of concentration, or general education program requirements.
  3. Only one course per semester may be registered for under the pass-fail option.
  4. No more than 12 semester hours of credit may be taken under the pass-fail option during a student's college career.
  5. Students may not choose this option when re-registering for a course.
  6. When registering under the pass-fail option, a course that is passed will count as hours in the student's record but will not be computed in the grade point average. A course that is failed will appear on the student's record and will be computed both in the overall average and the semester average.
  7. Students registering for a course under the pass-fail option are required to complete all regular course requirements. Their work will be evaluated by the instructor by the normal procedure for letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. The grades A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D- will automatically be converted by the Office of the Registrar to the grade P on the student's permanent record. The grade F will remain as given. The choice of grading option may be changed only during the schedule adjustment period for courses in which the student is currently registered.

Repeat Course Guidelines

The following repeat course guidelines apply to ALL courses that may not be repeated for additional credit.

  1. The following students are required to follow the repeat guidelines effective Fall 1990:
    1. All new freshmen who began at University of Maryland, College Park Fall 1990 and after.
    2. Transfer students from schools other than Maryland community colleges who began at University of Maryland, College Park, Fall 1990 and after. This includes transfer students from another University of Maryland institution.
  2. There is a limit to the number of times a student may repeat a course. Students may have one repeat of any course in which they earned an A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, P, S, W, NG or Audit; they cannot be registered (after the schedule adjustment period) for any given course more than twice. A student’s dean’s office may grant an exception allowing an additional course repeat. In this case, students must present a plan for successfully completing the course. All attempts will be counted toward the total limit for repeatable credits.           
    Note: Students may not choose the Pass-Fail option when re-registering for a course or re-register for a course in which a grade of "I" has been noted.
  3. Students may repeat no more than 18 credits. Additionally, if a student withdraws from all courses during a semester, those courses are not included in this limit.
  4. The grade point average will include all attempts at a given course that result in a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or F. However, to help freshmen and transfer students adjust to the University of Maryland, College Park, the following two exceptions allow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so that only the higher grade is included:
    1. When the repeated course was taken within the student's first semester at University of Maryland, College Park, or
    2. When the repeated course was taken within the student's first 24 credit hours attempted (including transfer credits) or within the semester during which the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted. Advanced Placement Exam credits do not count toward the 24 credit count.
  5. Any grade earned in prior attempts of a repeated course will appear on the student's transcript, regardless of whether the grade is dropped from, or included in, the cumulative grade point average.
  6. Repeat by transfer: If a student repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or during the semester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted (including transfer credits) and the transfer grade is higher, then the original grade in the course will be excluded from the GPA calculation.
    1. If the course was taken after the semester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted, the original grade remains in the GPA calculation.

Repeat Guidelines Prior to Fall 1990

The following students follow the previous repeat guidelines:

  • Students who began at University of Maryland, College Park, before the Fall 1990 semester (including students who enter University of Maryland, College Park for summer 1990).
  • Transfer students who began at a Maryland community college before Fall 1990.
  • UMBC College of Engineering students who began before 1990.

The highest grade received in the repeated course is used to calculate the GPA. A student may repeat any course; however no student may be registered for a course more than three times.

If a student repeats a course in which he or she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, or S, the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned toward the degree. Only the highest mark will be used in computation of the student's cumulative average. Under unusual circumstances, the student's dean may grant an exception.

Statement on Classroom Climate

The University of Maryland values the diversity of its student body and is committed to providing a classroom atmosphere that encourages the equitable participation of all students. Patterns of interaction in the classroom between the faculty member and students and among the students themselves may inadvertently communicate preconceptions about student abilities based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation. These patterns are due in part to the differences the students themselves bring to the classroom. Classroom instructors should be particularly sensitive to being equitable in the opportunities they provide students to answer questions in class, to contribute their own ideas, and to participate fully in projects in and outside of the classroom.

Of equal importance to equity in the classroom is the need to attend to potential devaluation of students that can occur by reference to demeaning stereotypes of any group and/or overlooking the contributions of a particular group to the topic under discussion. Joking at the expense of any group creates an inhospitable environment and is inappropriate. Moreover, in providing evaluations of students, it is essential that instructors avoid distorting these evaluations with preconceived expectations about the intellectual capacities of any group.

It is the responsibility of individual faculty members to review their classroom behaviors, and those of any teaching assistants they supervise, to ensure that students are treated equitably and not discouraged or devalued based on their differences. Resources for self-evaluation and training for faculty members on classroom climate and interaction patterns are available from the Office of Human Relations.